Road safety rating system proposed

British roads could receive official “star ratings” to help drivers identify the most dangerous routes, according to new government proposals.

According to government ministers, the rating system could be used not only to improve safety, but to highlight areas with bad records and to increase the likelihood of roads being fixed.

Five-star system

The five-star system proposed is similar to the EuroRAP road assessment programme, which assesses and grades the safety of major roads across Europe.

As a result, roadways could be given star ratings with one star being given to the worst roads, while the best would get five stars.

Ministers including roads minister Robert Goodwill have expressed a keen interest in following up the plans, and have emphasised the positive impact that such systems could have on safety.

It’s hoped that the adoption of an official rating system by the government would help drivers understand which types of road and regions carry the highest risk of accidents.

As well as that, it could also be used to shame local authorities into improve safety measures and could be incorporated into online journey planners to help drivers avoid accident blackspots.

Paul Watters, head of roads policy for the AA, said: “It is about awareness of where the real accidents are happening and where the chances of you being killed and injured are genuinely a bit greater.

“I would have thought it is the type of thing they wouldn’t have wanted to reveal a decade or two ago.”

EuroRAP

The current EuroRAP system uses accident data to analyse risk levels on all motorways an A-roads in the UK and throughout the rest of Europe, using a colour coding scheme similar to a starring system.

Its latest report, released on Monday, identified a 19km stretch of the A285 between Chichester and Petworth as the “most dangerous” stretch of road in the UK.

However, it also highlighted the most improved road between the M25 and Amersham, where accidents had been reduced by 92 per cent due to improved road markings and new cats’ eyes.

No official decision has yet been made on whether to officially adopt a government-backed starring system, but the roads minister said that he was petitioning officials to pay closer attention.

At the launch of the EuroRAP results on Monday, he said: “I recognise the positive impact star rating systems have had on the safety of vehicles and roads around the world.

“Such a system could help simplify future road safety policy. Star ratings can only improve standards like it does in hotels and car safety as long as the measuring system is above board.”

British roads could receive official “star ratings” to help drivers identify the most dangerous routes, according to new government proposals.

According to government ministers, the rating system could be used not only to improve safety, but to highlight areas with bad records and to increase the likelihood of roads being fixed.

The five-star system proposed is similar to the EuroRAP road assessment programme, which assesses and grades the safety of major roads across Europe.

Worst roads in Britain

As a result, roadways could be given star ratings with one star being given to the worst roads, while the best would get five stars.

Ministers including roads minister Robert Goodwill have expressed a keen interest in following up the plans, and have emphasised the positive impact that such systems could have on safety.

It’s hoped that the adoption of an official rating system by the government would help drivers understand which types of road and regions carry the highest risk of accidents.

As well as that, it could also be used to shame local authorities into improve safety measures and could be incorporated into online journey planners to help drivers avoid accident blackspots.

Paul Watters, head of roads policy for the AA, said: “It is about awareness of where the real accidents are happening and where the chances of you being killed and injured are genuinely a bit greater.

“I would have thought it is the type of thing they wouldn’t have wanted to reveal a decade or two ago.”

The current EuroRAP system uses accident data to analyse risk levels on all motorways an A-roads in the UK and throughout the rest of Europe, using a colour coding scheme similar to a starring system.

Its latest report, released on Monday, identified a 19km stretch of the A285 between Chichester and Petworth as the “most dangerous” stretch of road in the UK.

However, it also highlighted the most improved road between the M25 and Amersham, where accidents had been reduced by 92 per cent due to improved road markings and new cats’ eyes.

No official decision has yet been made on whether to officially adopt a government-backed starring system, but the roads minister said that he was petitioning officials to pay closer attention.

At the launch of the EuroRAP results on Monday, he said: “I recognise the positive impact star rating systems have had on the safety of vehicles and roads around the world.

“Such a system could help simplify future road safety policy. Star ratings can only improve standards like it does in hotels and car safety as long as the measuring system is above board.”

British roads could receive official “star ratings” to help drivers identify the most dangerous routes, according to new government proposals.

According to government ministers, the rating system could be used not only to improve safety, but to highlight areas with bad records and to increase the likelihood of roads being fixed.

The five-star system proposed is similar to the EuroRAP road assessment programme, which assesses and grades the safety of major roads across Europe.

As a result, roadways could be given star ratings with one star being given to the worst roads, while the best would get five stars.

Ministers including roads minister Robert Goodwill have expressed a keen interest in following up the plans, and have emphasised the positive impact that such systems could have on safety.

It’s hoped that the adoption of an official rating system by the government would help drivers understand which types of road and regions carry the highest risk of accidents.

As well as that, it could also be used to shame local authorities into improve safety measures and could be incorporated into online journey planners to help drivers avoid accident blackspots.

Paul Watters, head of roads policy for the AA, said: “It is about awareness of where the real accidents are happening and where the chances of you being killed and injured are genuinely a bit greater.

“I would have thought it is the type of thing they wouldn’t have wanted to reveal a decade or two ago.”

The current EuroRAP system uses accident data to analyse risk levels on all motorways an A-roads in the UK and throughout the rest of Europe, using a colour coding scheme similar to a starring system.

Its latest report, released on Monday, identified a 19km stretch of the A285 between Chichester and Petworth as the “most dangerous” stretch of road in the UK.

However, it also highlighted the most improved road between the M25 and Amersham, where accidents had been reduced by 92 per cent due to improved road markings and new cats’ eyes.

No official decision has yet been made on whether to officially adopt a government-backed starring system, but the roads minister said that he was petitioning officials to pay closer attention.

At the launch of the EuroRAP results on Monday, he said: “I recognise the positive impact star rating systems have had on the safety of vehicles and roads around the world.

“Such a system could help simplify future road safety policy. Star ratings can only improve standards like it does in hotels and car safety as long as the measuring system is above board.”

Star ratings

British roads could receive official “star ratings” to help drivers identify the most dangerous routes, according to new government proposals.

According to government ministers, the rating system could be used not only to improve safety, but to highlight areas with bad records and to increase the likelihood of roads being fixed.

The five-star system proposed is similar to the EuroRAP road assessment programme, which assesses and grades the safety of major roads across Europe.

As a result, roadways could be given star ratings with one star being given to the worst roads, while the best would get five stars.

Ministers including roads minister Robert Goodwill have expressed a keen interest in following up the plans, and have emphasised the positive impact that such systems could have on safety.

It’s hoped that the adoption of an official rating system by the government would help drivers understand which types of road and regions carry the highest risk of accidents.

As well as that, it could also be used to shame local authorities into improve safety measures and could be incorporated into online journey planners to help drivers avoid accident blackspots.

Paul Watters, head of roads policy for the AA, said: “It is about awareness of where the real accidents are happening and where the chances of you being killed and injured are genuinely a bit greater.

“I would have thought it is the type of thing they wouldn’t have wanted to reveal a decade or two ago.”

The current EuroRAP system uses accident data to analyse risk levels on all motorways an A-roads in the UK and throughout the rest of Europe, using a colour coding scheme similar to a starring system.

Its latest report, released on Monday, identified a 19km stretch of the A285 between Chichester and Petworth as the “most dangerous” stretch of road in the UK.

However, it also highlighted the most improved road between the M25 and Amersham, where accidents had been reduced by 92 per cent due to improved road markings and new cats’ eyes.

No official decision has yet been made on whether to officially adopt a government-backed starring system, but the roads minister said that he was petitioning officials to pay closer attention.

At the launch of the EuroRAP results on Monday, he said: “I recognise the positive impact star rating systems have had on the safety of vehicles and roads around the world.

“Such a system could help simplify future road safety policy. Star ratings can only improve standards like it does in hotels and car safety as long as the measuring system is above board.”